obis

More Celebrities In Kimonos

wafuku blog aug 12 logo A

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my www.wafuku.co.uk Wordpress blog

I found more photographs of celebrities in kimonos.
These are in addition to the celebrities in kimonos I also have HERE.

Everyone loves a kimono, regardless of gender, status or era.

John & Yoko Lennon

tumblr_kskrc5tumn1qz6f9yo1_500

.


Gwen Stefani.
Ever gorgeous. I love that ichimatsu obi.
gwen-stefani

I suspect her tag was meant to say #pricelessjapan

322b395a00000578-3490901-picturesque_the_mother_of_three_sat_admiring_the_view_outside_a_-m-52_1457924448204.



Shirley Temple.

Looking cute in a shichi-go-san kimono.

shirley-temple

.


Culture Club, with Boy George.
George wears a colourful kakeshita kimono while the other band members go for monochrome patterned cotton yukatas.

2015-02-20-11-21-36

.


Evelyn Nesbitt.
She is wearing a kimono that cost $3,000 way back in 1900. Evelyn Nesbit was a popular American chorus girl, an artists’ model and then an actress. She lived a life of controversy and died in 1967, aged 82.

evelyn-nesbit-in-3000-kimono-in-1900s

.


Audrey Hepburn.
Wearing a lovely houmongi kimono .

audrey-hepburn-early-1950s

.


Michael Jackson.
In kimono and hakama, complete with katana.

01781145c342e8f5684ae011ba3fe0be

.


David Bowie in kimono.
He seemed to have a great liking of Japanese Kimonos and, of course, his Ziggy Stardust tour costumes were designed by a Japanese designer, Kansai Yamamoto. I think his short kimono type garment in the photo below is by Kansai Yamamoto.

david-bowie-playing-ping-pong-in-a-kimono

.


Marlene Dietrich posing in a very beautiful, Japanese furisode kimono, with striking design of Japanese cranes. Cranes signify loyalty and longevity.

Did you know that Japanese, red crowned cranes dance for each other. Not just to win a mate, they mate for life and continue to dance for each other. It is such an endearing trait.

marlene-dietrich-in-a-kimono-1935

.


Gene Simmons from Kiss.
I posted this in a previous post but feel he should be in one that lists kimono clad celebrities.

Simmons

.


Rita Ora.
One of my vintage, silk kimonos, from wafuku.co.uk, modelled by the beautiful Rita Ora.

haorisweeritao


You can also check out my www.wafuku.co.uk website, providing vintage & antique Japanese kimonos & collectables.

www.wafuku.co.uk

——————————————–

————————————–

Please note that any advertisements shown below my posts are put there by WordPress, not by me. I am not responsible for whatever product or service is advertised and it being there does not mean that I endorse or recommend it. 

Kimonos, Cats and Cords

wafuku blog aug 12 logo A

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my www.wafuku.co.uk Wordpress blog

Wafuku.co.uk in another magazine feature.
My website and I were part of a feature in the How To Spend It, the FT magazine, a few months ago, in their fashion edition.

how-to-spend-it


Huge Kumihimo.
I have two of these huge kumihimo; they are enormously long, hand braided, silk cords, each with a loop at the centre and lovely tassels on the end. They are unused and the tassels are still wrapped in paper. I have no idea what they are for . I think they may have been made for a Buddhist or Shinto temple, because they very thick and long, pure silk, hand made, rather special and must have been exceedingly expensive to produce. They are really rather lovely and, when you move the cord about in your hand it has that lovely sound that silk makes, like footsteps in deep, crisp, new snow.
In that photo my daughter is holding just one of them.

1

9


Contemporary Take On Kimono.
This floaty, contemporary kimono is by Hayami Mariya.

kimono-and-obidome-by-hayami-mariya


Pretty Kimono.
Although this will fit an adult as a beautiful robe, it is actually a girls’ kimono but girls wear them with a big tuck in the shoulders and at the waist, which reduces the size of them a lot. They are always made big so tht these tucks can be inserted, so, without the tucks, they can fit adults surprisingly well. My adult daughter, whom you can see holding the kumihimo in a photo above, wears this size of kimono a lot. She especially likes them because they come in bright colours with vibrant patterns

189739_1009526410337_7107_n

Here she is again, wearing a kimono of same type and size. She is not a tall woman, so it is ankle length on her; on a tall woman they would be shorter.

200389_1009526970351_9349_n


Feline Fabulous.
Check out these great cat obis. I would love these.

cat-obis

————————————————————————————–

You can also check out my www.wafuku.co.uk website, providing vintage & antique Japanese kimonos & collectables.

www.wafuku.co.uk

——————————————–

One of my kimonos being modelled by the singer Rita Ora

haorisweeritao

————————————–
————————————–

Please note that any advertisements shown below my posts are put there by WordPress, not by me. I am not responsible for whatever product or service is advertised and it being there does not mean that I endorse or recommend it. 

Tomesode & Tiger Bags

wafuku-blog-horse logo

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my www.wafuku.co.uk Wordpress blog

————————-

Coastal Scene Tomesode. I have been looking through some photos of kimonos I bought in 2012 and this is one of them. I wish I could remember which box it is in. It has fabulous textile art, displaying a coastal scene. One has to have beee rich and extravagant to have commissioned a kimono with lavish and high quality artwork like this one.

1

————————————–

2

————————————–

3

————————————–

4

————————————– ————————————————-

Huge Tiger and Lion Backpacks. I fell for these huge, great, dramatic backpacks when I saw photographs of a few people in Tokyo’s Harajuko area with them. There’s a brown tiger, a white tiger and a lion. I tracked them down and got just a couple of each to make available on www.wafuku.co.uk and got a brown tiger one for myself. I might keep one of each.

hbt1

————————————–

hbt2

————————————–

hbt5

————————————–

hbt6

————————————–

hl1

————————————–

hl2

————————————–

ht1

————————————–

ht2

————————————–

ht3

————————————– ————————————————-

Bamboo on Purple. This is a silk Nagoya obi I recently added to my website. It is such a glorious colour and the bamboo is just lovely.

po1

————————————– ————————————————-

One of my kimonos being modelled by the singer Rita Ora

haorisweeritao

————————————– ————————————————-

You can also check out my www.wafuku.co.uk website, providing vintage & antique Japanese kimonos & collectables.

www.wafuku.co.uk

——————————————————————————————

——————————————————————————————

Please note that any advertisements shown below my posts are put there by WordPress, not by me. I am not responsible for whatever product or service is advertised and it being there does not mean that I endorse or recommend it. 

Catwalk Kimonos & More

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my www.wafuku.co.uk WordPress blog

 get this blog’s RSS feed 

————————-

Here’s  Jotaro Saito’s 2011 collection of kimonos and obis. I particularly like the men’s kimonos and some of the women’s obis are made from fabulous textiles.

This video has the designer talking (with English subtitles) and shows some of the obit textiles close up,  and the video below it has the actual fashion show

———————————-

———————————-

Here’s a girl in Harajuko (2012) looking lovely in a kimono, with an old fashioned, crocheted shawl and very contemporary hair colour and giraffe bag.  Note how her feet hang over the outer side of her zori shoes; which is standard with traditional zori and geta, as the toe post that goes between the big toe and second toe, is in the centre of the sole and not offset the way it is on western flip-flops. Nowadays some zir are made with the offset toe post but it’s much more usual for it to be central and the foot to hang slightly off the outer side of the shoe.

The photo is from Tokyo Fashon, a site I love.

————————————

Now, I don’t know if this shop in Osaka, Japan didn’t know the English translation or if they didn’t care and went for shock tactics but this is a sign you certainly wouldn’t find during the sales here in UK (via japansubculture.com)

————————————

This next photo shows a woman in USA, photographed walking through a park on her way to a wedding, wearing a man’s montsuki kimono and looking very good in it. I would have chosen a wider, stiffer belt/sash but I think she looks great in her men’s kimono. Her kimono has fuji (wisteria) mon (crests). The photo is from a blog site I love and one of my daughter’s favourite sites, called Advanced Style, showing older women with a sense of style, who, unlike many of the older generation, have not given up making an effort in their appearance, though I have to admit that some have not given up their favourite eras either and have stuck to the clothing of the era they liked best and said to hell with whether they are considered a tad out of date.  They will soon be retro anyway and that is always interesting and good.

—————————————–

Interested in Japanese ghosts, goblins and ghouls? Check out this post on Weird Asia News

————————————

————————————

How to Fold a Nagoya Obi & Other Obi Info

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my Wordpress blog

 get this blog’s RSS feed 

————————-

In this blog post you will find Nagoya obi, otaiko musubi tying instructions, how to wear obi makura, obiage and obijime, the names of the parts of an obi and the shapes and scale of different types of obi.

Let’s start with the folding instructions for Nagoya obis
Opened up your Nagoya obi and at a loss about how to fold it again?

I have put together the instructions below, to show you how to do it. You can drag the image to your desktop to keep a copy for use without having to come online for it.

Further down this page you also will find instructions for wearing an obi makura, obiage and obijime.

You can fold it up smaller, if you prefer, just do 4 folds at the last step instead of 3, then it is smaller but thicker

When I have time, I will draw out instructions for converting a Nagoya Obi into a tsukure (two part, pre-shaped, easy wear) one, with the taiko musuba (taiko knot) section, pre-folded and stitched into its ready to wear shape, and a separate sash, and post the instructions on this blog.

Whether a normal Nagoya obi, like the one above, or a tsukure Nagoya obi, you need an obi makura (bustle pad), for inside the top of the taiko knot, to pad it out, an obiage to hold the makura and the top of the knot section in place and an obijime to hold the centre section of the obi knot in place.

Obi Makura

Makura means ‘pillow’ and an obi makura is bustle padding that’s worn inside the top of an obi’s  taiko shaped rear knot, to pad out the top of it. The obiage holds the makura in place, though sometimes makuras also have ties.

Obiage

An obiage is an obi ‘scarf’, worn through the rear knot, over the makura, and tied at the top of the sash at the front, then tucked partially behind the sash. The obiage helps hold the makura and the obi’s rear knot in place. This pink obiage has shibori work; shibori is a very fine tie dye patterning that not only decorates it but makes it stretchy, so it is much longer than this photo of it unstretched makes it look. You can see how the shibori work pulls the patterned sections in, making them narrower than the sections without it.

Obijime

An obijime is an obi cord, worn through the centre of the obi’s rear knot and around the centre of the sash, tied at the front with the ends tucked into itself at the sides. It helps hold the obi’s rear knot (musuba) and the sash in place.
The diagram below shows how they go together on an obi with a taiko musuba (square taiko knot).

Names of obi sections

The next diagram shows you the names of the parts of an obi, both untied and tied into an otaiko musubi (taiko knot). Despite the fact that the knot is called taiko, meaning drum, and the base of the knot is described as the bottom of the drum, the obi musubi’s name taiko is not because of the Japanese hand drum, it was named after the Taiko Bridge because some geisha wore this new design of musubi at the bridge’s initial opening ceremony and this particular style then became fashionable and known as the taiko musubi and has remained very popular ever since.

Types of women’s obi

The following diagram shows the various types of obi to scale. It’s not very obvious but the fukuro obi is a little bit narrower than the maru obi. Only the sash section of the tsuke (two part) obi is shown. The tsuke’s knot is separate and pre-shaped.

———————————

Women’s Obi Types

Darari obi is a very long maru obi worn by maiko. A maiko’s darari obi has the kamon insignia of its owner’s okiya in the other end. A darari obi can be 600 centimetres (20 ft) long.

Fukuro obi (pouch obi) is a grade less formal than a maru obi and the most formal obi actually used today. It has been made by either folding cloth in two or sewing two pieces of cloth together. If two cloths are used, the cloth used for to make the backside of the obi may be cheaper and the front cloth may be for example brocade. Not counting marriage outfits, the fukuro obi has replaced the heavy maru obi as the obi used for ceremonial wear and celebration.[8] A fukuro obi is often made so that the part that will not be visible when worn are of smooth, thinner and lighter silk.[7] A fukuro obi is about 30 centimetres (12 in) wide and 360 centimetres (11.8 ft) to 450 centimetres (14.8 ft) long. When worn, a fukuro obi is almost impossible to tell from a maru obi. Fukuro obis are made in roughly three subtypes. The most formal and expensive of these is patterned brocade on both sides. The second type is two-thirds patterned, the so-called “60 % fukuro obi”, and it is somewhat cheaper and lighter than the first type. The third type has patterns only in the parts that will be prominent when the obi is worn in the common taiko musubi.

Fukuro Nagoya obi or hassun Nagoya obi (“six inch Nagoya obi”) is an obi that has been sewn in two only where the taiko knot would begin. The part wound around the body is folded when put on. The fukuro Nagoya obi is intended for making the more formal, two-layer variation of the taiko musubi, the so-called nijuudaiko musubi. It is about 350 centimetres (11.5 ft) long.

Hakata obi (obi of Hakata) is an unlined woven obi that has a thick weft and thin warp.

Hoso obi (thin sash) is a collective name for informal half-width obis. Hoso obis are 15cm (5.9 in) or 20cm (7.9 in) wide and about 330cm (10.8 ft) long.

Hanhaba obi (half width obi) is an unlined and informal obi that is used with a yukata or an everyday kimono. Hanhaba obis are very popular these days. For use with yukata, reversible hanhaba obis are popular: they can be folded and twisted in several ways to create colour effects. A hanhaba obi is 15 centimetres (5.9 in) wide and 300 centimetres (9.8 ft) to 400 centimetres (13 ft) long. Tying it is relatively easy, and its use does not require pads or strings. The knots used for hanhaba obi are often simplified versions of bunko-musubi. As it is more “acceptable” to play with an informal obi, hanhaba obi is sometimes worn in self-invented styles, often with decorative ribbons and such.

Chuuya obi or Hara-awase obi is an informal obi that has sides of different colours/designs. Chuuya is often spelled chuya and means daytime and night time; the earliest chuuya obis were bright on one side and black on the other, like night and day, hence the name. Chuuya obi were used by iki-suji ladies in ancient Japan; iki-suji means a kind of kimono expert, such as a Geisha. Chuuya obi are now obsolete and are collectors’ items. They are fequently seen in pictures from the Edo and Meiji periods, but today it is hardly used. A chuuya obi has a (usually) dark, sparingly decorated side and another, more colourful and festive side, this way the obi can be worn both in everyday life and for celebration. The obi is about 30 cm (12 in) wide and 350 cm (11.5 ft) to 400 cm (13 ft) long.

Heko obi (soft obi) is a very informal obi made of soft, thin cloth, often dyed with shibori. Its traditional use is as an informal obi for children and men and there were times when it was considered totally inappropriate for women. Nowadays young girls and women can wear a heko obi with modern, informal kimonos and yukatas. An adult’s heko obi is the common size of an obi, about 20 centimetres (7.9 in) to 30 centimetres (12 in) wide and about 300 centimetres (9.8 ft) long.

Hitoe obi (means “single-layer obi”). It is made from silk cloth so stiff that the obi does not need lining or in-sewn stiffeners. One of these cloth types is called Hakata ori. A hitoe obi can be worn with everyday kimono or yukata. A hitoe obi is 15 centimetres (5.9 in) to 20 centimetres (7.9 in) wide (the so-called hanhaba obi) or 30 centimetres (12 in) wide and about 400 centimetres (13 ft) long.

Kobukuro obi is an unlined hoso obi whose width is 15 centimetres (5.9 in) or 20 centimetres (7.9 in) and length 300 centimetres (9.8 ft).

Kyo-bukuro obi (capital fukuro obi) was invented in the 1970s in Nishijin, Kyoto. It lies among the usage scale right between nagoya obi and fukuro obi, and can be used to smarten up an everyfay outfit. A kyo-bukuro obi is structured like a fukuro obi but is as short as a nagoya obi. It thus can also be turned inside out for wear like reversible obis. A kyo-bukuro obi is about 30 centimetres (12 in) wide and 350 centimetres (11.5 ft) long.

Maru obi (one-piece obi) is the most formal obi. It is made from cloth about 68 cm wide and is folded around a double lining and sewn together. The ornate pattern is along the entire length and on both sides. Maru obis were at their most popular during the Taisho and Meiji-periods. Their bulk and weight makes maru obis difficult to handle and nowadays they are worn mostly by geishas, maikos and others such. Another use for maru obi is as a part of a bride’s outfit. A maru obi is about 30 centimetres (12 in) to 35 centimetres (14 in) wide and 360 centimetres (11.8 ft) to 450 centimetres (14.8 ft) long, fully patterned[9] and often embroidered with metal-coated yarn and foil work.

Nagoya obi, or when differentiating from the fukuro Nagoya obi also called kyu-sun Nagoya obi, the nine inch nagoya obi) is the most used obi type today. A Nagoya obi can be told apart by its distinguishable structure: one end is folded and sewn in half, the other end is of full width. This is to make putting the obi on easier. A Nagoya obi can be partly or fully patterned. It is normally worn only in the taiko musubi style, and many Nagoya obis are designed so that they have patterns only in the part that will be most prominent in the knot. A Nagoya obi is shorter than other obi types, about 315 centimetres (10.33 ft) to 345 centimetres (11.32 ft) long, but of the same width, about 30 centimetres (12 in). Nagoya obi is relatively new. It was developed by a seamstress living in Nagoya at the end of the 1920s. The new easy-to-use obi gained popularity among Tokyo’s geishas, from whom it then was adopted by fashionable city women for their everyday wear. The formality and fanciness of a Nagoya obi depends on its material just like is with other obi types. Since the Nagoya obi was originally used as everyday wear it can never be part of a truly ceremonial outfit, but a Nagoya obi made from exquisite brocade can be accepted as semi-ceremonial wear. The term Nagoya obi can also refer to another obi with the same name, used centuries ago. This Nagoya obi was cord-like.

Odori obi (dance obi) is a name for obis used in dance acts. An odori obi is often big, simple-patterned and has patterns done in metallic colours so that it can be seen easily from the audience. An odori obi can be 10cm (3.9 in) to 30cm (12 in) wide and 350cm (11.5 ft) to 450cm (14.8 ft) long. As the term “odori obi” is not established, it can refer to any obi meant for dance acts.

Sakiori obi is a woven obi made by using yarn or narrow strips from old clothes as weave. Sakiori obis are used with kimono worn at home. A sakiori obi is similar to a hanhaba obi in size and extremely informal.

Tenga obi (fancy obi) resembles a hanhaba obi but is more formal. It is usually wider and made from fancier cloth more suitable for celebration. The patterns usually include auspicious, celebratory motifs. A tenga obi is about 20cm (7.9 in) wide and 350cm (11.5 ft) to 400cm (13 ft) long.

Tsukure obi (also seen as  tsuke obi or kantan obi) is any ready-tied obi, often in two parts, the sash and the knot, making it very easy to put on. It was first invented to aid women with arthritis who could no longer pull hard enough to tie their obi knots but it became popular with other women too, because it is so quick and convenient. The tsuke obi is fastened in place by ties. Tsuke obis are normally very informal and they are mostly used with yukatas but also available as more formal two-part nagoya obis.

White obi: In a traditional Japanese Shinto wedding ceremony, a bride will wear a white obi on her white kimono. In the Edo era, a widow may dress in all white to signify that she will not remarry. Thus, some very old, white obi may not have been used for weddings. The bride will change into numerous outfits on her wedding day, often brightly coloured ones as well as the white Shinto one. Formal obis worn by men are much narrower than those of women (the width is about 10 centimetres (3.9 in) at its most). The men’s obi is worn in much simpler fashion than women’s: it is wrapped around the waist, below the stomach and tied with a simple knot in the back.

————————–

Women’s Obi Accessories

Obiage is a scarf-like piece of cloth that covers up the obimakura and keeps the upper part of the obi knot in place. These days it is customary for an unmarried, young woman to let her obiage show from underneath the obi in the front. A married woman will tuck it deeper in and only allow it to peek. Obiage can be thought of as an undergarment for kimono, so letting it show is a little provocative.

Obidome is a small decorative accessory (obi ‘brooch’) that is fastened onto obijime at the centre front of the obi. The obijime threads through it and, when an obidome is worn, the obijime is tied at the back, inside the rear knot, instead of at the front. It is not used very often nowadays.

Pocchiri is a maiko’s especially ornate obidome. These maiko obidome are very decorative and very large. Once they graduate to full geisha/geiko, they no longer wear an obidome at all.

Obi-ita is a separate stiffener that keeps the obi flat, as it stops it creasing when one bends. It is a thin piece of cardboard covered with cloth and placed between the layers of obi when putting the obi on. Some types of obi-ita are attached around the waist with cords before the obi is put on.

Obijime is a cord, about 150 centimetres (4.9 ft) long, that is tied around the obi and through the knot,[15] and which doubles as decoration. It can be a woven string, or be constructed as a narrow sewn tube of fabric. There are both flat and round obijimes. They often have tassels at both ends and they are made from silk, satin, brocade or viscose. A cord-like or a padded tube obijime is considered more festive and ceremonial than a flat one.

Obi-makura is a small pillow that supports and shapes the obi knot, it acts as bustle padding. The most common knot these days, taiko musubi, is padded out at the top with a makura.

————————–

Men’s obi types

Heko obi (soft obi) is an informal, soft obi, free flowing and usually made of shibori (tye-dyed) fabrics, traditionally silk. It is tied very informally. The adult’s heko obi is as long as a normal obi at 300cm (9.8 ft) to 400cm (13 ft), but relatively wide at up to 70cm (28 in). Adult men wear the heko obi only at home but young boys can wear it in public, for example at a summer festival with a yukata. On men it is tied to sit just below the belly at the front and tied slightly higher on the waist at the back.

Kaku obi (stiff obi) is another obi used by men. A formal kaku obi is about 10 centimetres (3.9 in) wide and 400 centimetres (13 ft) long and depending on its material, colours and pattern is suited to any and all occasions from everyday wear to a close relative’s funeral. A kaku obi typically is made of hakata ori which has length-wise stripes and woven pattern based on Buddhist symbols and is worn tied in the simple kai-no-kuchi knot.

————————–

Netsuke

A Netsuke is an ornament suspended from the top of the obi and worn mostly by men. A pouch or container (remember, kimono have no pockets) can be attached with a cord and the netsuke stops the cord pulling out of the obi, securing the pouch that hangs below the obi.

————————–

Children’s Obi Types

Sanjaku obi (three foot long obi – but it is not the Imperial foot measurement of 12 inches) is a type of men’s obi. It is named after its length, three old Japanese feet (about 37.9 cm / 14.9 inches). The obi is sometimes called simply sanjaku. During the Edo period it was popular among the people as the obi for yukata-like kimonos because of its ease of use. According to some theories, the sanjaku obi originates from a scarf of the same length, which was folded and used as a sash. A sanjaku obi typically is shaped like a kaku obi, narrow and with short stitches. It is usually made from soft cotton-like cloth. Because of its shortness, the sanjaku obi is tied in the koma musubi, which is much like a square knot.

Shigoki obi was utility wear in the time of trailing kimonos, and was used to tie up the excess length when going out. Nowadays the shigoki obi’s only function is decorative. It is part of a 7-year-old girl’s outfit for celebration of shichi go san. Most often it is red or vermillion, sometimes bright green, with tasselled ends. You can see an woman wearing one on a white kimono in a photo on many of my women’s kimonos’ detail pages.

Heko obi A soft obi, like men’s heko obis, but in bright colours, usually tie died. Tied in a soft, simple bow at the back.

Tsukure obi (pre-tied, 2 part) is a popular obi used for children because of its ease of use. There are formal tsukure obi available for children. These obis correspond to fukuro obis on the formality scale.

———————————

The picture below shows an extended obi makura, known as azuma sugata, also known as a karyou makura, which aids in tying a variety of obi knots, such as fukurasuzume knots (sparrow knots), like the ones you see below it.

———————————

Displaying an obi
Here are some very nice ways to display an obi, which are actually really simple to do.

———————————————————————-

English Wedding with Bride in Kimono

wafuku logo

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my WordPress blog

Here you see Deborah who very recently got married in England and wore a kimono and obi as her wedding dress. Deborah looked absolutely beautiful; graceful, elegant, ceremonial, striking and so very happy. Below you can see the photo from their wedding.

The groom’s red tie was well chosen to link with with the red in Deborah’s ensemble. I am most grateful to her for sending me the photo and for them allowing me to show it here.

Deborah said, ‘I thought I had set myself quite a challenge when I wanted to get married in a kimono and we were planning the wedding within 2 months. My husband was really impressed. He loved the kimono instead of the traditional bridal gown, it really added the joyous atmosphere to the day and a great talking point. I’m sure I will be buying more.’

Below you can see some close-up detail of that kimono, with its fabulous, vibrant flower design

The next photo shows you the backround design on the kimono’s silk; Japanese gardens.

The following photo shows you the colourful design on the front shoulder.


Broken Bone And Post Office Ineptitude

wafuku – noun: traditional Japanese clothing

Welcome to my Wordpress blog

 get this blog’s RSS feed 

————————-

Broken Bone
My 88 year old mother fell from an outdoor step and broke her arm. For 4 weeks she’s been home with just a strap round her neck and wrist and the break untreated. On Friday she has an operation to remove the top part of the humerus bone (the ball part  that fits into the shoulder socket and part of the straight section of the bone too) and have it replaced with an artifical bone section. Rather worrying, as a full anaesthetic and a 3 hour operation is very risky for her due to her age and the fact that she has had a few ischaemic attacks recently (mini, momentary strokes), which means much more chance of a major stroke occurring because of the operation. See X-ray below…

broken bone

I’ve marked the break on the X-ray. The ball top part of the humerus is in the correct position. The pink line indicates the break at the base of the ball.
The lower part of the bone is pushed up and over to the right, the broken end marked with a green line. The green and pink lines should sit exactly on top of one another.

———————————

Post Office
I am furious with the Post Office. I sent a package to Switzerland and I asked the woman at the Post Office counter if I needed to put on a customs label, as, although in Europe, Switzerland is not part of the EU.  She insisted I didn’t need one.
The package arrived in Switzerland and, because it had no customs label, Swiss customs had to get in touch with the addressee and find out the contents and their value. Their value was low enough not to require import duty but, because the lack of customs label meant they had to contact the addressee, she was charged about £13 administration fee by them, which I have to reimburse. I will be complaining to the UK Post Office and insisting that fee is refunded to me, as there would have been no fee if there had been a customs label on the package. I wonder how successful that will be.

I am not a happy bunny!

post office logo

———————————